Law Technology News
June 2002
American Lawyer Media Sites

The American Lawyer Magazine

National Law Journal

Law Catalog

Law.com Sites

law.com

law.com Seminars

Automated Lawyer

New York

California

Pennsylvania

New Jersey

Other states

Networking & Storage

Iomega Corp., of San Diego, Calif., has introduced its Iomega CD-RW 40x12x48 FireWire Drive. It can capture and share photos, music, and other digital content. Its digital audio extraction speed is 32x, which means it can rip a 60-minute CD-R in approximately three minutes. A buffer under-run protection allows users to perform other computer tasks while the CDs burn, says Iomega.

Reader Response no. 214.

Hewlett Packard Co. has introduced HP SureStore Virtual Arrays 7100 and 7400. Both are designed for heterogeneous environments, and allow for mix-and-match disk drives. Administrators can perform online firm-wide upgrades without interrupting service, it says.

The 7400 offers a VA 7400 base enclosure with dual power supplies, and two controllers, each with 512 MB mirrored cache, says HP.

Reader Response no. 215.

Gefen Inc., of Woodland Hills, Calif., has released the ex-tend-it DVI Switcher. The company says the unit can be used three specific ways: First, users can switch between two companies using just one digital display. Second, users can switch between four computers using one display. Third: Users can switch between two computers using two displays, in order to create a dual-screen, digital workstation. Remote control units are also available.

Gefen has also released its latest Universal Serial Bus (USB) extender, the USB-200, which can extend two USB peripherals up to 330 feet from a computer via cable.

Reader Response no. 216.

Imperial Technology Inc., headquartered in El Segundo, Calif., says its SANaccelerator and File Cache Accelerators have been certified with LSI Logic Corp.'s 2 GB LSI449290 and LSI409190 Fibre Channel host bus adapters (HBAs).

Both HBAs operate at speeds up to 2 GB and are fully backward compatible with the existing 1 GB SAN infrastructure, the company says.

Reader Response no. 217.

Addonics Technologies Inc., of San Jose, has debuted a pair of USB 2.0 tools, which can upgrade older notebook PCS to USB 2.0, or add additional ports to existing systems.

The CardBus USB 2.0 Adapter provides USB 2.0 capability to any CardBus-equipped computer. It plugs into the CardBus slot of any computer to offer two USB 2.0 slots.

The USB 2.0 Hub is designed for users who need additional USB ports on their systems or want to connect a USB 2.0 device that is up to 15 feet away. It adds four high-speed USB 2.0 ports to any computer with USB connection, and operates at USB 1.1 speed when connected to USB1.1 port.

Reader Response no. 218.

Greencomputer Innovations, based in Edmonton, Canada, has released its new 1GHz PowerElf server appliance. It provides processing power, as well as new programs for network administration, targeted for small firms, businesses, schools and branch offices.

New software features include mail server/file anti-virus scanning, content filtering, service controls, advanced system logs, and port forwarding. The PowerElf can be administered from any Windows, Macintosh or Linux computer inside the network or remotely over a secure 128-bit encrypted connection, it says.

Reader Response no. 220.

KDS USA, of Garden Grove Calif., has released the PC-Controlled CD Organizer. It attaches to a PC and is controlled with a software program, and helps users store and catalog up to 75 discs, says the company.

Reader Response no. 219.

Advanced Records Management Services Inc., of Danvers, Mass., has expanded its headquarters facility. Its operations include a fireproof media vault constructed with high temperature insulating fiber to protect data stored in sensitive digital and magnetic formats.

Reader Response no. 221.

OfficePopup helps users send messages and alerts to any person on a network.

The software gives managers the ability to install a receive-only version on certain workstations and its local network design and lack of executable attachments limits unwanted messages and the propagation of viruses. From Montreal, Canada's Smart Software Development.

Reader Response no. 222.

Inside
Editor's Note
Publisher's Report
Letters



Compare & Contrast
Instant Messaging Wars
Imaging Technology
I.T.@Baker & Mckenzie
People
Quick Takes
Second Opinions
Small & Home Office
Snap Shot: Albert Barsocchini
Tech Circuit
Technology On Trial
Video Conferencing
Web Bookmarks
Web Watch



Acquisitions
Client Roster
Court Docket
Document Management
Frontlines
Litigation Support
Mac Corner
Mail Call
Networking & Storage
Office Gear
Partnerships & Alliances
Portable Office
Practice Tools
Security Checkpoint
Spotlight: Upgrades
Utilities Roundup
Web Works



Correction
Corrections Policy
Privacy Statement and Terms and Conditions of Use
© 2002 NLP IP Company. All rights reserved